A Girl After My Own Heart

Mother Teresa said, if you can’t feed 100 people, then feed just one, which brings me to Emily, a woman who walks around with homemade sandwiches she passes out to the needy.

I’ve seen her on the train and in front of Penn Station, but it wasn’t until we met in my own neighborhood that I got to know her.

Born in Brooklyn, widowed after only 5 years, the thing that propelled her into service was the loss of her two twin boys traveling with their father when a drunk driver hit them head on.

Apparently he was a man who had lost everything in the stock market, had stolen a car theoretically to kill himself, unexpectedly taking her family with him.

“I could have hated the world for the rest of my life,” she told me wistfully, “but then thought of the pain he must have been in to do such a horrible thing.”

I felt as if I was in the presence of an apostle, one handing out tuna and egg salad on rye, on a street corner, in New York…

sigh

SB

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About Susannah Bianchi

I'm just a girl who likes to write slightly on slant. I've had a career in fashion, dabbled in film and to be honest, I don't like talking about myself. Now my posts are another matter so I will let them speak for themselves. My eBooks, A New York Diary, Model Behavior: Friends For Life and Notes From A Working Cat can be found on Amazon.com. Thanks.
This entry was posted in Faith, Family, food, Love, New York City, parents, violence, women and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to A Girl After My Own Heart

  1. micklively says:

    Feed one and they call you a saint; feed a million and they call you a communist. I’m not sure where a hundred sits in that pantheon. Emily sounds like a remarkable woman. Finding compassion in tragedy must take strength I don’t possess.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is unusual, I’ll admit. I’ve wondered if such an extreme loss didn’t remove her, for lack of a better term, from reality just a bit. Maybe it’s the only way she can get through such devastating circumstances.

      Liked by 1 person

      • micklively says:

        If reality was my family obliterated by a drunk, I might choose removal. They say forgiveness is cathartic but few travel that path.

        Liked by 1 person

      • She’s young also. Resilience reigns. I remember the Asian couple in my old building who had a baby. I even wrote about it. Well one Sunday he didn’t wake up. Crib death. I’ll never forget it, and despite the loss, they lived there another year, stayed together and had another baby. They’re in their 20s.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Oso Whispers says:

    What a gift it is to see beyond the outward appearance of another. Thank you for sharing your gift.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It’s not often that we get to be in awe of something or someone, thank you for sharing your time with Emily … I’m officially in awe.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. skinnyuz2b says:

    Emily is truly an inspirational spirit. I don’t think I could be so forgiving.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Elle Knowles says:

    People handle loss in different ways. She heals by giving to others who also need help to go on each day. Touching story. I just watched a wonderful movie on Netflix about Mother Theresa. ‘The Letters’. If only more people could see the power in giving, especially of themselves… ~Elle

    Liked by 2 people

  6. It’s incredible how things change people and what they do with the change. I don’t know if I would be as compassionate, I would hope I would… but, I don’t know. Thank you for this story, you, as usual bless me. Cathi

    Like

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