Let It Be

It’s been very hard sitting still, during what’s been going on in my beloved city. Yes, I’ve come to realize how much New York means to me, weeping for her weakened state.

I still go out twice a day, walking carefully, avoiding those I can, since panic has taken on new life on the streets and avenues.

Had a couple I see daily, walking their dog, almost get hit by a truck jumping in the street to avoid being even 20 feet from me, like I was the virus, in sweats.

I cried as I walked home, for them, more than me.

My fear has been tempered, put in a proper place attributing it to prayer since, God and I have become fast friends as of late.

I remain bewildered: a feeling of being perplexed and confused, like you’ve been hit over the head; an elbow in the eye, a kick to the groin.

I watched a young Asian girl in my building, scream at the doorman for not standing with his head down behind the door as he opened it for her.

And no, Norma Rae kept silent, only because, like the couple in the street, she was not herself, driven by a force that had her by the hair.

Just then, Nature, who we can always count on, brought Jack, the German Shepherd, images-5.jpeg by to comfort and soothe.

Those big brown eyes that rival George Clooney’s looked at me and Mike as if to say, I know how ya feel, people are afraid of me all the time, just because I’m German.

Mike scratched his ears, me his butt since, there’s nothing quite like an impromptu hiney rub, remembering Nature is always our best teacher.

images-1 2.jpegConsider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin…Matthew 6:25 -34

SB

 

About Susannah Bianchi

I'm just a girl who likes to write slightly on slant. I've had a career in fashion, dabbled in film and to be honest, I don't like talking about myself. Now my posts are another matter so I will let them speak for themselves. My eBooks, A New York Diary, Model Behavior: Friends For Life and Notes From A Working Cat can be found on Amazon.com. Thanks.
This entry was posted in animals, Culture, grace, Health, humanity, inspiration, Love, nature, New York City, words and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

91 Responses to Let It Be

  1. skinnyuz2b says:

    Susannah, it’s feast or famine upstate. People are either ready for the apocalypse or skipping around totally unaware.
    Half the people don’t wear a mask or gloves in the grocery store. Did they get an immunization shot that I don’t know about? Pookie’s brother and sister-in-law have their three grandchildren over for sleepovers as well as dinners with them and the children’s parents.This would be crazy enough, but the children’s mom is a working nurse!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think here too, though the streets are fairly empty. When I run, no one is around, but when I come back there are more early risers. I’m so polite, but sometimes it doesn’t matter. People feel it’s only happening to them. There’s no unity to be had. I feel for the essential workers that now over their mask, wear visors, like race car drivers. Every day things get more visually surreal. I’m perplexed at that nurse. If anyone should know about precautions, it should be her. Denial merged with desperation at wanting life to resume, is a deadly combo. Thank you Skinny. Let you, Pookie and your family remain safe.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. aFrankAngle says:

    Once again, you made me smile. More importantly, I’m glad to know you are safe and your sense of humor and kindness are still in place.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Vasca says:

    Susannah, a good friend of mine is unfortunately quarantined w/his wife (they were in midst of separating). She, a teacher, was hosting a high school party which was a huge no-no and managed to have him served divorce papers in its midst. Vindictiveness had stepped to front and center. In my quarantined corner-of-the -world things are placid. “And yet I say unto you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these”.
    Stay strong and safe…God is in control as always. Hugs ‘n prayers for you, my friend.

    Like

    • Sorry about your friend. Yes, that was right out of a bad novel what she did. Kindness even towards those you don’t necessarily care for, is what should be front and center. But I too have seen some bizarre behavior. She’s got comrades I’m afraid.

      Like

  4. kingmidget says:

    I’m glad you’re getting outside twice a day and doing so as safely as possible. I’ve had a couple of conversations (via email) with friends in recent days. Both have expressed that they’re in the doldrums and they can’t really even describe why. I’ve told them that, as much as possible, we need to keep doing things. Every day. And there is no reason we can’t go outside and feel the sun on our face and go for walks or runs. As long as we’re not doing so in packs. And it’s also important to reach out to friends and family and find ways to maintain those interactions.

    I’m pretty certain Jack is a very special dog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s exactly right. I’m still alone when I go out, but can tell you this, if I didn’t make those frequent forays, and believe me, I use that word literally since, it’s like war out there with the people you do encounter, I’d go mad. I run in the morning, and then go out again to get what I need. In all day, then at 4 go out for a little spin. I do think the social distancing is truly helping, but you need to be rational where your own actions take you. I’m rambling, but you get it Mr. Midget, I’m sure. GO OUT. GO OUT. GO OUT!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Yes … GO OUT. You may be “alone” while you’re doing it, and there may be people out there who are handling this less than well, but still … there are interactions out there that can help remind you and them of each other.

        Liked by 1 person

      • That’s right. I saw yoga boy this morning and I felt good knowing, life even during this, on some level goes on. ALSO…TELL THEM STOP WATCHING THE NEWS. If they need to know something they will. The infections are dropping, and life will commence, just not today. Writing helps. and reading. Books, like John Adams said, if you have one, it means you have a friend.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Yeah. I have a couple of good friends, who have been cooped up at home. Working from home for the first time ever. And they don’t like it. They are both married. One has two kids, the other one. The one with two kids gets outside several times a day for walks and runs. And while she is out she talks and engages with the people she sees, all appropriately distanced, of course. She also gets food for an elderly neighbor. I get the feeling my other friend’s interactions have been more limited and almost entirely with just her husband and daughter. After a life time of working at the office and being out interacting with all sorts of people, that could be quite a shock. It’s good to get out and see that the world really is continuing. Last night, I got pizza from a neighborhood place that I’ve been going to for 35 years. It was good to see them open and doing a pretty good take out business last night. Life continues. It’s important that we all find ways to connect. And yes, stop watching the news! I’m struggling with writing, but that started long before the pandemic.

        Like

      • Butt in chair, as Anne Lamott says in Bird by Bird, one word at a time. Even if you just muse looking at the page it counts. As far as your friends go, the active one who helps her neighbor has the winning hand. Doing that small act of kindness makes a big difference in how you feel about everything, not just the virus. Giving is liberating. Now, butt in chair. ✍🏻

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        I know. It really should be that easy, shouldn’t it?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Don’t make it so hard. Just put time aside and show up. Every writer goes through this.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Indeed. I know that’s what I need to do. Start with an hour a day, maybe just a half hour to get started. And write uninterrupted for that time. Rationally, I know this. I know this. But “don’t make it so hard” is easier said than done. 😉 I have a blog post to write and then I’ll go upstairs and “butt in chair” the thing.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Right foot left foot. Read the beginning of Bird by Bird on Amazon. They let you peruse the first 20 pages or so. It will inspire you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        I’ve read most of that book. My biggest issues are (1) distractions; and (2) my internal editor. And how those two things interact with each other. If the little voice in my head keeps saying “this is crap, this is crap” than the distractions are more appealing because who needs that kind of abuse, you know. If I could just figure out how to silence the voice, or at least quiet it a bit …

        I’ll go look for my copy of Bird by Bird and follow your advice. It’s time for me to stop whining and putting it off.

        Liked by 1 person

      • First of all, you’re not whining, you’re art is mewling out of its need to write. Artists are sensitive, and we all have censors. Julie Cameron wrote a book I keep by my bed called, The Right to Write. Maybe you can get a used copy on Amazon that by the way, are sending books fast during this in-home season. I never think I’m a good writer, and even if someone says something kind I don’t believe it so you’re not alone. Kurt Vonnegut, my hero, well one of them, said he sometimes felt he was writing with a crayon in his mouth. It has more depth than that, but my point is, the best of the best had a censor. Distractions. How about ideas that get out of hand. Here’s another suggestion. Keep penning your blog posts even if it’s just a quote you share. It will get you in the habit of showing up on the page. All I know. Happy Easter whether you celebrate or not…a metaphor for new beginnings.

        Liked by 1 person

      • King Midget…I hope i didn’t overstep my bounds saying too much. If so, I apologize.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Absolutely not!!! I’ve been struggle by with for four or five years now. I need all the encouragement I can get. And yours was presented with kindness and understanding. No need for an apology.

        Like

      • Okie-doxie. Just checkin’ 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Don’t ever worry about my ability to take it. 😉 I really appreciated that you took the time to encourage me, and that’s how I took every word. Encouragement, not criticism or anything else.

        Like

      • Definition of encouragement…
        the action of giving someone support, confidence, or hope. As they say in AA, I’m all in. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        I appreciate you!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you. What a nice thing to say. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Thank you for your encouragement.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Google some writing quotes. Doctorow has a great one about writing with just your headlights. We all need encouragement.

        Liked by 1 person

      • PS I appreciate you reading what I wrote.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Of course. I appreciate your sharing of your experiences in NYC. It is a real experience unvarnished by the news readers or politicians.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Sacramento, California.

        Liked by 1 person

      • The capital. So you’re probably hit, but much less than L.A. or Hell-A, as Bill Hicks called it, and the Bay Area. That’s good, to be out of the line of fire.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Yeah. The county published a breakdown of cases by zip code a couple of days ago. Our zip code had something like 15 cases, which probably sounds unbelievable to somebody in NYC. San Francisco shut down earlier than just about anybody else and it shows in their numbers.

        The thing to me though is that I don’t trust any of the numbers. Far too many issues with testing to have any confidence in them.

        Stay safe, young lady, but keep living your life as much as you possibly can.

        Liked by 1 person

      • You too. And despite how it looks, this too shall pass, and hopefully we’ll be better prepared next time since our arrogance has been hopefully lessened.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vasca says:

        Thankful you are cautious; many innocent people who venture out and observing the rules seem to be accosted by some fanatics who think you’re illegal. Why then are they out? Inconceivable!!! How bad is that? Ugh. There are lots of peeps who have simply lost it. ..or could be they never had it. Yeah, that’s it. Be safe…you’re watchful I know which is great.

        Like

      • People are acting out from severe fear. I try not to take it personally but it’s getting harder to be magnanimous. This too shall pass.

        Like

  5. Oh my.
    Your words…that dog…have me crying all the way over on the other coast of the US.
    Continue to be safe. And keep writing. I loved reading this.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Have been thinking of you and praying for you. I haven’t stayed online a whole lot, trying to keep busy. Had done so much during our first quarantine this year with hubby’s cancer surgery, so now am trying to be creative of what to do. Cooking is okay, but, have started to bake again,which is dangerous. We are out walking nightly, but not consistently as hubby is still using a cane and does not have much stamina, fortunately, with a small rural neighborhood, we are not seeing the fear that most neighborhoods are. Stay safe. You are loved and appreciated, although you never hear from me, you are daily in my thoughts. Cathi (DAF)

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sooner or later this will be over. It is hard to keep that in mind surrounded by constant reminders of the situation. Sitting here in the Austin burbs is not the same. I feel for you and the City.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Mine was named Joy. 110 pounds of purebred German Shepherd. Rescued from a breeder who considered her “flawed” because of malfunctioning tear ducts. (Named her Joy to counteract her look of crying all the time.) 16 years with her. My heart Dog!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Sorryless says:

    Human nature is to protect that patch of earth that exists from your nose to your fingertips. In times like these, I tend to agree with you that we can’t take these seeming affronts personally. Because hell, EVERYTHING is personal right now. I literally (yes, literally) thanked God for giving me the sense to see that. Well, I left a voicemail because he’s got a lot on his plate right now.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Dale says:

    Yes. Go out. Get air. See people from afar. Show that you have a place in the world, even though it is so off-kilter we keep losing our balance. And definitely do not take anything like people’s (over)reactions. We are all doing the best we can.
    And oh my God, Jack looks like baby Zeke!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Waving at you, neighbor. We’re in this together. E-hugs if they help (non-Covided and fully in-the-soul). Na’ama

    Liked by 1 person

    • Stay off the train and go for solitary walks keeping your safe distance, and read. My cure all. 👍

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yeah. Not on the train because I’m leaving it to my essential-worker friends, and taking solitary walks is good. Reading is excellent. Chocolate helps … 😉 Keep well, neighbor!

        Liked by 1 person

      • It’s amazing how much money one saves when they are house bound. I am very aware of the bravery of every essential worker I encounter. You know they’re scared, but there they are so I can get coffee, and you chocolate. sigh

        Liked by 1 person

      • Chocolate and coffee — NY staples. 😉
        But, yes, my friend who works in a restaurant is very brave. She is anxious taking the train to work every day. Still she does. Because there are so many people who rely on ordering in food. And I have friends who are nurses in the hospitals. They are my heroes. I’ll think of us all, all over the city, when I clap and bang pots and pans with my neighbors at 7pm tonight. Stay safe!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Read Peggy Noonan’s oped in the Wall Street Journal, online. She talks about those pots and pans, and I’m certain you’d appreciate another proud, humble New Yorker’s point of view.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Reading, walking, and petting a dog…good ways to get through these stressful days.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Going outside is supposed to make us feel better. Your soft heart gets battered. I hope you have a better day coming up. Happy Easter!

    Liked by 1 person

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