The Written Word

The world can be a very cold place, especially of late, so we savor the good and unexpected.

I had a woman who follows me write a stray comment that just said…I’m concerned about the girl in the box. It was an essay I penned about a homeless girl in my neighborhood who sleeps in one. I was so touched on her behalf, that someone clear across the country was concerned about her.

The 10 year-old upstairs who likes to bake, left toll house cookies in front of my door with a note that said…My mom says, these will cheer everybody up, so we made lots. I gave you more than Frank.  Love, Jacob (Frank’s the super).

Patrick, the cat, who hasn’t visited lately, slid a message under my door.

I haven’t been out since the stay at home rule. My dad is watching me pretty carefully so I can’t go for my midnight stroll. I hope we have tuna together real soon. I’m leaving you an orange. Patrick.

But my favorite missive was from the elderly couple on 12 who I had gotten masks for after they said, they were too afraid to come out. This was way before we had to wear them, and were very hard to come by, but even then they still wouldn’t come out.

Persistence paid off after the Easter lily I left by their door along with gloves, hand wipes and a little bunny card that said…

You can do it. I know you can.

So after being home for 18 days, they wrote…

Dearest Suzanna,

We are so happy today, coming out for the first time. The air. Oh the air smells so good. We walked up Park welcomed by the tulips and stood on the corner smiling at the sun, joy in our hearts. Thank you for helping us.

Your Neighbors on 12

P.S. We took your advice and wore sneakers.

“I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.”   Anne Frankimages-2.jpeg

SB

 

 

 

About Susannah Bianchi

I'm just a girl who likes to write slightly on slant. I've had a career in fashion, dabbled in film and to be honest, I don't like talking about myself. Now my posts are another matter so I will let them speak for themselves. My eBooks, A New York Diary, Model Behavior: Friends For Life and Notes From A Working Cat can be found on Amazon.com. Thanks.
This entry was posted in animals, Beauty, Culture, dessert, Faith, friendship, grace, Gratitude, Home, humanity, humor, nature, New York City, words, writing and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

67 Responses to The Written Word

  1. You are always so good to people around you! That’s marvelous that Jacob brought you cookies and Patrick left you an orange. Being in the older age range myself, I can understand the gratitude of the couple on 12. You made it possible for them to breathe again!! As always, you are a breath of fresh air to many people.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. aFrankAngle says:

    What a wonderful collection of stories. Little things make a huge difference – and people appreciate them, such as oranges and cookies. I’ve gone from my contacts and send texts to 60-70 different people. As a matter of fact, I should do that today. Keep smiling!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. skinnyuz2b says:

    So uplifting, Susannah. You touch the hearts of so many.
    It is a fearful time. Not just for ourselves, but for those we love and care about. This mother’s day my four children and their families are pacing their visits out over today and tomorrow. I wonder what our 6 week premie grandson thinks when half our faces are covered in white. Hidden smiles and expressions not to be seen..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh Skinny. I’m sorry things are the way they are. I just came in from the Park, my one hour of guaranteed grace, and the trees and flowers speak to me. They too lose their leaves and bloom, but come back in full leaf, and flush blossom. We will too. You’ll see. Hug your grandson a lot, even if it’s just in prayer. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • skinnyuz2b says:

        I was fortunate to be present at his birth. He was perfectly healthy, just a couple weeks early and only 5 pounds 3 oz.
        The lockdown began the day my daughter went home. If he’d been born just a few days later I couldn’t even visit, much less witness the miracle of birth. I misspoke (miswrote), he is almost 8 weeks now.

        Liked by 1 person

      • That’s a wonderful story. A little bundled blessing, 5 pounds, 3 oz. 🙂

        Like

  4. I enjoy reading your stories of people showing their best side. Of course, your best side prompted a comparable return. Stay well.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Kate Howell says:

    Sweet 😎

    ~Hal Rubenstein From my iPhone

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Vasca says:

    Love really does change everything, doesn’t it? My heart is shedding a few tears this morning as I learned two of my dear friends have been diagnosed with the beastly monster COVID-19. Both are named Betty…ironically! They are wives of men who fought in Korea along side my husband. A young friend was stricken a week ago… she has little daughters 2 and 4. Makes for sadness but prayers are lifted for all of them. Must always remember to be kind. loving, sharing…all those good things! That’s what you’re doing. God is in control…He is LOVE and we should follow suit…that’s my aim. Love you, Susannah. “Do not be shaken for HE is right beside you,” I pray you have a beautiful day. Well…why not Happy Everyday? I wish it. Bye, bye for now!

    Like

    • Sorry to hear about your friends. They will heal. Hope you know, you inspired this post.

      Like

      • Vasca says:

        Yes I know…I think of that girl so often. She is in my heart somehow! My aim in life has always been to encourage others. I want to put ‘extra’ in the ordinary! I know someone names Susanna who also is led to do that. Right on, friend.

        Like

      • I saw her early this morning, sheltering in place, in her box. Someone covered it with a big sheet of plastic because the temperature dropped. I don’t know for sure, but I think she has people who do things for her. Leave her things. She’s been there for such a long time, It would stand to reason.

        Like

  7. kingmidget says:

    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if a couple of things survived this whole crazy time: (1) small acts of kindness and the joy they bring; and (2) the power of a note, an expression of support, words of kindness, messages of caring and of love.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Notes nowadays are rarities, though I send them frequently and teased for them quite often. I still say, there’s nothing like a note, or card nesting in your mailbox.

      Random acts of kindness resonate much more than say, writing that big check. To get up, close and personal with someone changes things in a quiet way, and sometimes that’s better. Thanks Mr. M. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hey M…have you ever read Assassination Vacation, by Sarah Vowell? She’s a funny, deft writer who loves history. She takes you on a tour of all the presidential sights where the 4 met their last. I know, it sounds ghoulish, but trust me. It’s a great read. You can get a used copy off of Amazon, or get on Kindle or iPad. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • kingmidget says:

        Actually, somebody else recommended it to me a couple of months ago and I read it. It’s an interesting combination of history, humor, and some self-reflection by Vowell. I enjoyed it. It’s why I read the McKinley biography. She covers his assassination and provided enough context about McKinley that I wanted to read more.

        Like

      • Excellent. I’m so glad to you read it. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Yes, Ann Frank found hope in her writing though she also took time to read. The give and take..the here and there…the follow and lead..in life are all important. Happy composing and listening to you.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Sorryless says:

    Shelter, the word, has become a disconcerting fix. As with most words, it was just minding its own business when the matters of the world hung it out to dry. The definition, while not changing in the least, has been lapped by the meaning of the word. To us. Now. Inside this new and very much unwelcomed reality.

    This is why words should always be handled with such delicate care. Because we never know when they might become something else entirely, through no fault of their own.

    Like

    • I’ve just read, New York City will stay sheltered till at least July. I’m sort of numb at the moment. Yes, words may be delicate, but misused, can really pack a punch. Gimme Shelter, has taken on all new distinction.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sorryless says:

        Numb would be the appropriate word. It carries forth, same essence to a wholly different bargain. When will it all end? Has been replaced with, what kind of new world will we be walking into? Eventually?

        Gimme Shelter was/is one of the few Stones selections I dig. Well . . dug?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’ve been humbled on so many different levels. I’ve surrendered to what is. There’s a great passage in AA’s Big Book that says, if you have no peace of mind it’s because you’re not accepting what is. It’s a wallop of a lesson, I’ll tell ya.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sorryless says:

        But one that gets taken out of the back pocket from time to time, I can imagine.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Without a doubt.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vasca says:

        Sheltered ’til July? Oh please not. I want to be able to go outside…to walk around outside. Oh well, doesn’t matter what I want or what anyone wants for that matter. Dear God, please – You are the best of everything. You are our shelter.

        Liked by 2 people

      • That doesn’t mean that you will. New York City remember, has been hit incredibly hard. They’re not taking chances of making an error, and despite how much I want life to resume, I understand.

        Like

  10. I love this in so many ways, for it reflects the many things I’ve seen and love in this City of ours, in this time. There is so much of this not-so-stray (with occasional orange) world of souls around us, isn’t there? It is all in the cookies, in the masks, in the words of hello, in the crinkle of recognition in the eyes above the face-covering. In the light-signals I have with the neighbors in the highrise a few blocks away but straight across as the crow-flies. We shake and circle, bobble and counter-clock. Every night at 7pm. It’s a hello. A recognition. Nameless and yet just as humane. It is what you captured in this post. Amen. 🙂

    Like

    • This was so beautifully written. Thank you, as we clang our pots in gratitude.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yep. My pan with a spoon, in this case, but yes, enthusiastically, between light-signaling … 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • I have a friend on East 78th who never misses his 7 p.m. pot banging. He looks forward to it all day. My contribution is thanking everyone one on one at each encounter. I know how scared they must be with no choice but to work, so my heart makes room for them. One could say, it’s stuffed to the gills.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ah, the Stuffed-to-the-gills-heart-syndrome! I know it well. The only remedy I found (other than heartbreak, which does make more room but at a high cost), is to breathe into my heart and watch it grow to accommodate a few more … and then it gets to the stuffed point again … and grows some more. Honestly, half the time I’m not sure how it still fits inside my chest. Or does it? I donnow? 😉
        As for how we thank – we do what we do where it works and how it works. There is no one way to be thankful. The noise-a-thon is one way. Works for some. Doesn’t work for others. A friend of mine faces a park. They hear little of the noise-a-thon and the see no one else. So they tried hooting out the window anyway. I think it was a little lonely, and I believe they moved on to sending cards and other forms of thanks. These are stuffed-to-the-gills-with-feelings times, aren’t they?
        Take good care of you!
        Your neighbor in heart-accommodation (it is a little like NYC apartments, I realize – we find room for what we need to find room for. :))

        Liked by 1 person

      • I go by the tents at Mount Sinai in the morning when I run. They humble me for one, but more than that, remind me how much worse it could be. As of now, I’m well and though my mental state has its ups and downs, my life remains intact, just in new, and hopefully, temporary packaging. I like that word when I see it…Temporarily Closed Due to Covid-19. It’s hopeful. The Gap and Barnes and Noble will open their doors once more. I just hope lessons have been learned. I so hope.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ah, those tents. Yes. And … yes to the “temporarily closed” – because as I just wrote a comment to another blogger-friend, NYC is always an interesting place to live in, and it is experiencing a different kind of ‘interesting’ these days … BUT, we’ll find our footing again. It may be a bit different, but yes, I believe the bookstores and other stores will re-open and that we’ll hug again. And if we learn from it and grow from it as a city, as a country, as a nation, as a people, as a species — that will be a good thing indeed.
        Take good care of you, and stay healthy! We need all of us as healthy as possible. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • You stay healthy too, you and all those you love and care for.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Dale says:

    Always wonderful to read your acts of kindness given and returned. It is what I hope stays after this thing we are living in becomes less a reality and more of a memory. I know, it will take a long time. There is nothing better than receiving a note. You see what you have created? Wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m a note sender. Like how they feel as you put your sentiments down, and the way it feels in your hand when you receive one. Email has spoiled a great tradition I wish would come back, but alas, know it will not. I spend a fortune on cards and note paper and am never as happy as when I’m in flight of purchase. Call me crazy.

      Like

  12. robprice59 says:

    Isn’t it strange how these challenging times bring out both the best and the worst in people?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, well said. I’ve seen so much bad behavior it’s stunning to me, yet then we have a kid delivering cookies and a cat whose owner, unbeknownst to me, does know when he goes for that midnight constitutional. My neighbor, Mimi, used to be the one to entertain Pat, so I’ve taken up the tuna mantle. He comes in like he owns the place. Trust, it’s awesome when you think about it.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. That’s so nice. It’s amazing how a quick note can raise your spirits. I know after ones I have received. 🙂 Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

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