Best Story of the Week…October 1st

It’s barely 7 a.m. as I leave my friend’s grocery store, after waking up to a mix of upsetting messages, unable to kick myself back into neutral.

My friend, when he sees a big tear roll down my cheek, fills a bag with fresh rolls, shoving them in my arms…

food, the Italian remedy for all things.

Waiting to cross the street, I see a man getting up, after spending the night sleeping beneath a store awning. He’s Latino, in his 40s, appearing slim and strong, with Elvis hair and very shiny boots, one left unlaced.

There’s an elegance about him, an air of dignity, despite his present circumstances.

On impulse, I stop and say, “Excuse me, would you like a fresh roll?”

His smile is immediate, as if I’ve read his thoughts. “Yes, I’d like one, very much.”

I gently, with a napkin, take one from the bag handing it to him, feeling instantly better since, a random act of kindness, even better than bread, can cure almost anything.

I then see a blind man on the arm of a runner en route to the Park.

A teenage girl is passing the other way with a wonky walk that looks like remnants of childhood Polio.

Unlike me, neither look as if they’re feeling sorry for themselves.

There are no accidents, since God tends to speak through others, so my bout of self-pity is washed away like debris on a deserted beach.

But back to the guy under the awning, after he thanks me for the roll. Before taking flight, like a sister, affectionately speaking to a brother say, “Tie your shoe.”

And without pause, placing his roll neatly in its napkin onto the store step, kneels on one knee, and with an added grace, does.

SB

About Susannah Bianchi

I'm just a girl who likes to write slightly on slant. I've had a career in fashion, dabbled in film and to be honest, I don't like talking about myself. Now my posts are another matter so I will let them speak for themselves. My eBooks, A New York Diary, Model Behavior: Friends For Life and Notes From A Working Cat can be found on Amazon.com. Thanks.
This entry was posted in Culture, Faith, fitness, food, grace, humanity, inspiration, New York City, words and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

36 Responses to Best Story of the Week…October 1st

  1. skinnyuz2b says:

    Rather than an admonishment, “Tie your shoes” was seen as the words of caring they were meant to be. I bet your words warmed his heart as much as the bun.
    We all have pity parties now and then. The important thing is knowing when to leave. I hear Annie singing, “The sun’ll come out tomorrow.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That’s grace, too — self-pity washed away. What a blessing you are!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. aFrankAngle says:

    Amazing how a random act of kindness can raise spirits of others and of self. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Vasca says:

    I love this Susannah…God does things like this all the time, that’s Him. Your friend gifted you with those rolls which was special. Voila, you ‘accidentally’ met someone who touched your heart. You, who had just been gifted became a ‘gifter’. A circle of love going round and round and where it’ll stop only God knows. Awesome.
    One of my favorite songs is: “Love Changes Everything” …it really, really does! Hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dale says:

    One act of kindness begat another and that’s how we change the world. Lovely post.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Great line, “my bout of self-pity is washed away like debris on a deserted beach.” It speaks loudly to the fact that we see others in much worse condition than ourselves and who don’t seem to be bothered by that fact. Well done, Susannah.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sorryless says:

    When you think about it, our connection to strangers helps us grow every bit as much as our connection to people we know and love. We will have thousands of interactions with complete strangers over the course of a normal life, many of them nourishing like the one you’ve penned.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Nicely said. I view most things, especially these days, as lessons to steer us more towards calmness and peace of mind. I don’t know about you, but lately I’m sitting 24/7 on the edge of my chair. The smallest thing strums me like a cheap banjo. I can let nothing pass, nothing roll off me. My sensitivity taking the rest of me, hostage. Oh Mr. Imma, the strangers in our midst are like substitute teachers that rather than a day, instruct for a mere minute. JUST A MINUTE…OPEN YOUR MIND TO CHAPTER 1…HOW IMPORTANT IS IT?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sorryless says:

        Wow if this is not a favorite comment.

        Liked by 1 person

      • How important is it is a 12 Step tenet since addicts tend to be easily riled, and you know where that can lead. Also, growing up as a kid with alcoholic parents, your senses sharpen like a cat’s never knowing what will be waiting for you. Will mom be happily baking, or cutting off the head of one of my dolls? I remember at 9, having eczema from being so nervous. Imagine explaining that to your classmates in gym class. I’m not squirrely for nothing Mr. Imma. sigh…will check out Heroes. Sorry to be late.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sorryless says:

        You reading me is good stuff, SB. When you read me matters less than the fact you keep coming back. πŸ™‚

        As for parents with that specific need? I relate. It was more patriarchal in nature, and I stopped blaming the drink when I finally figured out he was really good at being an asshole sober. The echoes reverberate, in everything.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Now there’s a good point. Yes, sober alcoholics still have the isms, more often than not…those defects in character..ah yes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sorryless says:

        I don’t wish to speak ill of the man, seeing as how I still talk to him maybe once a month. But that whole scene was crazy and quite often destructive.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hate to sound trite, but it’s very typical. Self absorption is the driving force. The me me me…it’s always about me. Comes with the troubled terrain the addict lives in. I didn’t have much of that because, you need an ego, and mine thanks to the alcoholics who badly raised me, never had much self esteem, which is the seed that distorts and runs wild. Who am I channeling I wonder.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sorryless says:

        I never had that ego either. I grew up with parents who loved hosting, and perception of a happy home mattered above all else. So it’s no wonder I came to resent such things. When you understand the lie, you can never be comfortable living it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Well put. As long as it looked good. sigh

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sorryless says:

        It’s why I pay attention to what people do and not what they say. It would seem so simple, and yet . . .

        Liked by 1 person

      • An old adage eternally true.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. robprice59 says:

    Oh how the world could benefit from a little less “grass is greener” and a little more “there, but for the throw of the dice, go I”. Great piece Susannah.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. That is beautiful, Susannah. There is a lot of grace in the world, if we are looking for it.

    Liked by 1 person

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